Welcome to Manchester Confidential
Reset Password
The Confidential websites will be undergoing routine updates. This may cause the sites to go offline. We apologise in advance for any inconvenience.

You are here: Manchester ConfidentialProperty & Business.

REVEALED: New Ancoats Town House Scheme

Jill Burdett on plans for fourteen new terraces next to St Michael's Church

Written by . Published on February 18th 2015.


REVEALED: New Ancoats Town House Scheme
 

A TWENTY-first century version of the back to back terrace is being planned for Ancoats.

Ancoats needs to be treasured, it’s one of the few bits of the city left with some cohesion and character

A scheme of fourteen, four storey, four bed houses in two rows sitting opposite the original Victorian terraces on George Leigh Street (main image) is set to be approved by Manchester City Council on Thursday 19 February.

Ancoats Town Houses

Ancoats Terraces Site 3Ancoats Town House site

A handful of residents have voiced their concerns that the new houses are too high and will loom over the quaint originals leading to loss of light.

They are also vexed as they say they were promised a consultation by the Homes and Communities Agency, which owns the site, but were first made aware of plans via a planning notification tied to a lamp post just before Christmas.

Many more are upset about the loss of the garden next to St Michael’s Church and more than 40 have signed a petition calling for it to be saved and turned into a community green space.

It seems a vain plea as both the garden and the Presbytery will need to go to accommodate the density of the new housing on the 12,400 sq ft site, the rear row of housing is so close to the Ice Plant building that borders the site that it doesn’t meet minimum distances (they have used Ancoats historic 'narrow street grid pattern' as an argument for approval).

Ancoats Terraces SiteAncoats terraces site

Ancoats Terraces 4Ancoats terraces front elevation

The scheme has been designed by Altrincham-based architects Calderpeel and while height and density are an issue, having decent sized houses with garaging and gardens will be a welcome addition to the housing mix in the area.

According to the Design and Access statement:

“Each house has a private double garage which is accessed via a central road between the two rows of terraces. This is covered by first floor gardens which keeps a car free environment to the fronts of the houses and creates a safe environment for the resident’s vehicles.

"Defensible space is provided to each unit, with the main entrance set back from the main elevation of the building, this provides an opportunity to create a space which can be inspired from similar spaces across George Leigh Street. A large open plan first floor living space makes full use of the light available to the site with full height glazing in both the front and rear elevations, which opens onto the first floor amenity deck.

"The second and third floor consist of four bedrooms, two en-suites and a family bathroom. Two terraces one on each of these floors give an extra element to these properties and are designed in such a way to remove the overlooking issue from the Ice Plant."

Ancoats terraces plansAncoats terraces plans

Ancoats terracesAncoats terraces (ice plant at the rear)

Nothing on record yet from English Heritage which says it will make any significant comments to the planning committee, but the New Cross Residents Group believes that the infrastructure (drains and whatnot) will not be able to cope and that the development is out of keeping with the character of Ancoats. 

Ancoats needs to be treasured, it’s one of the few bits of the city left with some cohesion and character and each piece of the regeneration jigsaw needs to be carefully considered if the whole picture is not to be ruined.

View the Ancoats Town House plans here.

Like what you see? Enter your email to sign up for our newsletters which are chock-a-block with more great reviews, news, deals and savings.

73 comments so far, continue the conversation, write a comment.

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

This looks great

2 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

Couldn't agree more. Exactly what this lovely area needs

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

Yes...more lovely areas please, Manchester.

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

How much?

2 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

10 billion Ugandan Shillings.

J. RizzaFebruary 18th 2015.

I think they claimed it will 1 pittance, paid in 20 equal installments of 1/20th of a pittance.

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

I think these will be a huge success and are appropriate to the city fringe.

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

Are these going to be affordable and offered first to local people or will they be simply snapped up by greedy Russian/Asian landlords?

1 Response: Reply To This...
AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

They will be given to the Egyptian sun god Ra as a sacrificial offering.

J. RizzaFebruary 18th 2015.

Little known fact. Ancoats was once known as Deeptrout due to a mysterious, yet alluring fishy odor which emanated from Priscilla Monk's cottage on the last Friday of every month. It gently wafted through the mills, hypnotising the loyal workers, to the very last man. Really makes you think about heritage and stuff...

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

Good point Re foreign investors - many property schemes today are basically get rich quick schemes for property developers / investors. Foreign investors don't have to pay capital gains tax -www.ibtimes.co.uk/uk-foreign-property-investors-immune-capital-gains-tax-impact-1431183…

Dave HoulbrookeFebruary 18th 2015.

Looks great, but should be 140 houses, not 14. I want one though!

6 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

Yes why so few? Dave is right it should be 140.What is this fear of building nice houses in the city centre. London has terrace after terrace of them and hence a wealthy cultured demograph. Someone has to start building houses or we will never attract families,just students and single people.

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

Maybe because it would be impossible to fit 140 houses on that piece of land? Fucking hell guys.

EditorialFebruary 18th 2015.

We're afraid Dave is not right. 14 it is.

QuelchFebruary 18th 2015.

Are there many nice houses right in the centre of the city of London?

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

I don't want families and noisy children in the city. That's what Stockport is for.

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

@Above Obviously you've never been to Piccadilly Gardens/Parker Street, Market Street, nor the Arndale Centre.

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

The side view looks a bit like the Factory Records logo. jimcofer.com/…/…

Steve5839February 18th 2015.

The images seem to show something completely incongruous with the area existing stock and not at all what should be being built. Why not just copy the existing, they have been built all over the NW and are called town houses, these are the standard sheet built nonsense.

2 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

So 140 would not fit on there,but how much more derelict land is there between there and the Ethiad. We need to be building continuously. Not just a few pathetic schemes like this. There has been a derelict plot near the Holt Town Met station for years. Get ambitious Manchester and stop being so timid about housing. To expand the city centre to Alan Turing way needs vision. Does anyone have any?

Voice of the Ironing BroadFebruary 18th 2015.

Minimum distances ...pah. Manchester doesn't subscribe to the national guidelines suggested on these anyway.

GimboidFebruary 18th 2015.

Great to see houses being built near to the city center. Disappointing that they're a really, really shite version of Chimney Pot Park.

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

I am going to reserve judgement on this development until it is actually built.

2 Responses: Reply To This...
Chris HawkeFebruary 18th 2015.

Quite hard to judge on an "artist's impression". I am somewhat suspicious how the two storey Ancoats terrace houses (in the 3d picture) appear similar in height and to cast a bigger shadow than the new development, which is described as 4 storey. I suspect it will be quite different from almost every other angle. Sure beats more flats though.

Steve5839February 19th 2015.

These are going to look like flats !

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

So many negative comments (again)! The design is interesting and imaginative. Each house has space for two cars effectively below the living areas. That's very unusual. So secure parking and no cluttering of the street with cars. The double terrace approach suggests the very early back to back 'court' terraces so there is a sort of homage to the industrial heritage. Prefer another bland block of flats?

5 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

A homage to our industrial heritage. I am presuming you are a Southerner. Does this mean that you have to have rickets and silicosis to apply for a mortgage.

QuelchFebruary 18th 2015.

Do you think a 'homage' to back-to-backs is somehow desirable? How about locating the toilets in an outside shack shared between families? Would that be 'interesting' enough for you?

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

A sensitively designed scheme that respects the unique character of Ancoats is exactly what the area needs. Too many recent builds have used cheap render or cladding panels and look dreadful. This both looks good and like it will make for nice homes to live in for the long term.

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

You want architecture that respects it's surroundings not necessarily copies it IMO.

Steve5839February 19th 2015.

Interesting and imaginative!!!! Take sheet construction materials, remove all charm and character and that's what we are getting. Where is the brick built buildings that are as the area. Grrrrrr.

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

Please do not quote the 1billion game changing plan for housing. Where are the actual diggers and builders? As ever it is taking an eternity I have seen very little evidence of any of that scheme being built yet and I work in Gorton. What happened to Holt Town ?and that row of quirky houses people designed themselves? No vision as I say. Those houses they are building near the coyttonfields Mudpit look nice. More like this around an open space. Even if it is around a midden. At least we have been spared another Ian Simpson horror I suppose. Anyone for a new vestibule folks? Oh sorry it is only the ginnel at the library that gets one of those to ruin it.

1 Response: Reply To This...
AnonymousFebruary 20th 2015.

The first public consultation on this scheme takes place on 5 March at Halle St Peter's

espoirFebruary 18th 2015.

the design of the houses looks hideous I hope they get turned down. They should build something in character with what is there already, i.e. red brick terraces like the beautiful ones in the photo.

3 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

Good idea why don't we rebuild Manchester how it was in the Victorian times. We could have open sewers running through the streets,rats and other vermin,tin baths and outside toilets. Maybe serve pobbies at the local caff and we can all wear clogs. Can't wait for the tripe shop to re open. Oh and that one week a year at wakes week in Blackpool will be so exciting. I am not used to a charra.

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

What's wrong with tripe?

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

And I eat pobbs for breakfast every morning, and still wear cloggs in the garden. What's wrong with pobbs and cloggs? I'm in my 30's by the way, not my 80's.

So IconicFebruary 18th 2015.

Looks good

AnonymousFebruary 18th 2015.

Agree, these look really promising.

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

This beautiful area that tourists, open top bus tours and historical walking tours visit regularly, not to mention all the ad companies that use it for shoots. A community garden is the best use of this space. It is currently mostly a beautiful garden that the local community has maintained for years. London has green pleasant community gardens, Manchester has next to none.

2 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

I thought it was just a patch of grass rather than a garden? I live round the corner and haven't seen anyone actually in it, or a gate. Not that I'd object to it becoming a garden, that could be nice. I quite like mustard tree's allotment patch.

Paul SoanesFebruary 27th 2015.

As a resident of George Leigh street, I would just like to say that a small community of different wildlife will be destroyed. Robins, Blackbirds, Thrushes and various Tits (little bird types) and their eggs will die. What a shame. We do need real housing in Ancoats though, and this development is needed for families to make this a community based area rather than (lets shut ourselves in our apartment all the time and not talk to our neighbour) community. As a resident I would like to see more green space in the local area for the up and coming families. Will this be possible? Only time will tell.

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

In Battersea in London they are building a mini Manhattan around the old power station and in Manchester people are getting overheated about 14 Townhouses in Ancoats. There are currently 200 skysrapers in the capital under construction and we are building hotels like the one on Aytoun street on the old labour exchange site three storeys high. Nobody has any ambition for this city where architecture is concerned. The Town Hall sanction one hideous scheme after another. Liverpool in contrast is turning their skyline in to one of the finest in Europe enhancing the old buildings with tall exciting structures. Our's could be any provincial British city. We still do not have an iconic building that is distinctly Mancunian. We are no different from Leeds and Birmingham,despite all the bravado we like to think we show.

15 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

Liverpool's modern buildings are truly awful and it has no skyline, and Leeds looks like it's built out of Lego. These townhouses in Ancoats look good though

shit biscuitFebruary 19th 2015.

Why compare Manchester to London? It's not London. It's a pointless comparison. In any case, iconic buildings are not the only thing that makes a good city that is distinctive from other places, and it's reductive and simplistic to think that they do. Do Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Vancouver have iconic buildings and recognisable skylines? No, but they're great cities. Dubai and Shanghai have among the most recognisable skylines and iconic high-rises, but I'm not sure they'd be considered desirable, attractive cities.

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

Actually there are tall buildings planned across the City Centre with a couple already under construction. They might not create the worlds greatest skyline but land values are certainly increasing.

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

'We still do not have an iconic building that is distinctly Mancunian'? The town hall, Central library etc. We'd have more if the council and or their owners hadn't had them demolished.

Chris GibsonFebruary 19th 2015.

"We'd have more if the council and or their owners hadn't had them demolished." Really, anon? What iconic buildings have been demolished?

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

Probably lots before I was born.

Chris GibsonFebruary 19th 2015.

So you're just guessing then?

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

Probably.

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

Actually York House was demolished by the Council.

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

Spring Gardens post office wasn't too shabby either. ickleweb.com/…

Chris GibsonFebruary 19th 2015.

Nice buildings, sadly lost. Iconic though?

So IconicFebruary 19th 2015.

Who decides whether something is iconic? Pointless debate really.

Crisps GibsonFebruary 19th 2015.

If no-one decides which buildings are iconic, the word has no meaning.

DanFebruary 19th 2015.

I would say Beetham Tower is pretty iconic.

AnonymousFebruary 20th 2015.

Iconic = subjective.

AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

When people on Mancon are talking about skylines I assume you mean lots of tall glass and steel buildings? Why is important for Manchester to have such a skyline? In fact, why do many on Mancon think it's important to compare Manchester to other cities? Can't the city make it's own way and have it's own identity?

5 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousFebruary 19th 2015.

Because people prefer to complain rather than getting off their arses to do something constructive.

AnonymousFebruary 20th 2015.

This is a parochial comment. Liverpool has the best skyline in the UK. It is instantly recognisable. Manchester is cluttered and there is no thought with any of the schemes. As for iconic buildings,why name the Town Hall? Would anyone in New Dehli know that building if you showed a picture of it? Silly question of course they would not. I was looking down Oldham st at that disgusting refurbishment of Piccadilly plaza and I thought what a view for a so called European city. And they keep making the same mistakes time and time again.The destruction of Piccadilly Gardens and taking away a quarter of the Gardens for that terrible office block that looks like a Benefits office . The Vestibule at the old library,First street,another big space filled with terrible architecture,the student castle at Oxford road(Hideous) and all that shabby beige and white rubbish on London road. Manchester is not Edinburgh. We will not ruin our skyline with tall structures we will enhance it. On a positive note. The new skyscraper at NOMA is great and will complement the CIS building. It has Chicagoan 1930s look.

AnonymousFebruary 20th 2015.

People in New Delhi? They wouldn't recognise the Houses of Parliament, what a stupid comment, and Liverpool has a skyline worse than Manchester, Leeds, Birmingham or London, the only thing that makes it recognisable to some is the river.

AnonymousFebruary 20th 2015.

Someone asked what iconic buildings had been demolished? Are you getting confused with iconic and ironic here,by being ironic? If the Taj Mahal was demolished,would we have to ask which of India's iconic buildings had been demolished?

AnonymousFebruary 20th 2015.

Because it looks nice.Or do you think that the view of the Arndale centre from Piccadilly Gardens makes visitors go weak at the knees? And that Muppet who thinks that people in New Dehli wouldn't recognise the Houses of Parliament is obviously in need of anti psychotics to deal with those delusions.

DanFebruary 19th 2015.

I saw the planning notice for this the other day, I was happy to see development on those empty lots. They look like they well blend with the area and it will be nice to have a big more life and activity on those streets.

DanFebruary 19th 2015.

Price wise, it's say they will easily be £240k-£280k.

Poster BoyFebruary 20th 2015.

All very odd.

1 Response: Reply To This...
DanFebruary 23rd 2015.

What about it do you find odd? That's a genuine question.

AnonymousMarch 8th 2015.

"Fourteen new terraces ..." A terrace is a group of houses joined together in a straight line ... perhaps they mean "fourteen new terraced houses" or "two new terraces of seven houses each".

2 Responses: Reply To This...
Crisps GibsonMarch 8th 2015.

People commonly say 'a terrace' for short as a type of house

AnonymousMarch 8th 2015.

Perhaps you need a night out Anon

To post this comment, you need to login.Please complete your login information.
OR CREATE AN ACCOUNT HERE..
Or you can login using Facebook.

Latest Rants

Anonymous

Repeating,without any evidence the same point that socialism = public services is hardly…

 Read more
Anonymous

You absolutely right,I hate all these bloody nimbys stopping development and progress.Of course if…

 Read more
Anonymous

Manchester's size and climate isn't dissimilar to Rotterdam or Dusseldorf but the city is held back…

 Read more
Anonymous

Straying off the point again David, which is that investing in public services is socialist but as…

 Read more

Explore The Site

© Mark Garner t/a Confidential Direct 2017

Privacy | Careers | Website by: Planet Code | SEO by The eWord