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Major Building For Piccadilly Basin

Jill Burdett and a new block from the prolific Manchester architect

Written by . Published on August 20th 2014.


Major Building For Piccadilly Basin

THIS is Ian Simpson’s design for a residential block on the bit of Piccadilly Basin that is currently a welcome patch of grass by the water.

This is a fantastic opportunity to add further character and distinctiveness to this attractive and increasingly popular part of the city.

It was always destined for development as part of the wider masterplan and after a recessionary hiatus of six years or so has been given a boost by the current market and confirmation of HS2 which will be landing nearby.

Residents in the listed buildings around knew development would happen but there does not seem much love for the detail of design, especially the steel and glass layers angled on top. One said: “We welcome development on the site and a building that complements Jacksons Warehouse will help to enhance the area but these particular plans are far too overbearing.”

Tariff Street proposal

Tariff Street proposal

A twitter group Save Manchester @SMasH and residents have been speaking to developers Leeds based Town Centre Securities in the hope of getting the plans amended but they are due before committee either September or October.

English Heritage has been heavily involved in discussions about the scheme.

The bulk of the building would be brick which does fit the Grade II* listed Jackson’s Warehouse and the whole area but I’m not convinced about the argument for the upper steel part, although the editor, Jonathan Schofield approves thinking it a strong design.

According to the planning document the best argument for its use is that it matches the nearby retail sheds.

It says: 'The red-brown sawn stone cladding of the lower volume has been chosen to complement the colour and variety of the traditional brick of Jackson’s Warehouse and the Tariff Street canal bridge, whilst the more reflective metal cladding of the middle volume recognises the modern materials of the Urban Exchange retail development and TCS car park in the wider local area. The development thus contributes to the sense of place, “reflecting the identity of local surroundings and materials”'

It goes on

The computer visualisations have demonstrated that the development is not as tall or dominant as some may initially have feared. Rotation of the upper volume separates it from the grounded volumes below and whilst the orientation of this top layer may seem a little arbitrary in contrast to the layers below, it is considered that this volume will not be ‘read’ in conjunction with the immediate historic environment.

At its highest it will be 11 storeys, with 91 apartments in total, four encased in the glass box on top.

This is not a cheap building and there are sustainable features like green roofs and bike storage and communal outside space it just seems a bit big.

Richard Lewis, Property Director at Town Centre Securities said: “This was a key site in the original masterplan for Piccadilly Basin. Our ambition has always been to create a high quality, superior waterside development that completes the marina. We are committed to sustainable development and have a solid reputation for quality and innovation.  This scheme will sit well with other high specification, design led buildings we have brought to the Basin including BDP’s offices and the stunning conversion of Carver’s Warehouse on Dale Street. In recent years TCS has worked hard to transform and regenerate the area, reopening the canal and tow paths, restoring historic mills, improving the public realm and building bespoke, design-led new buildings.

“We have worked with Ian Simpson before on other significant projects including our original masterplan and the Urban Exchange retail development, and are delighted to have them on board again. This is a fantastic opportunity to regenerate a previously developed brownfield site, add further character and distinctiveness to this attractive and increasingly popular part of the city centre and complete this part of the masterplan.” 

A patch of green soon to disappear

A patch of green soon to disappear

Piccadilly Basin’s recent history – click here for a piece on the history of the area by Jonathan Schofield

Piccadilly Basin has been owned by TCS since the late 1960s as part of the Arnold Ziff’s (founder of TCS) ownership of the Rochdale Canal Company. A masterplan for the area was developed in 1998 and since then TCS has invested heavily in improving Piccadilly Basin, in an attempt to create an attractive place to live, work and play. Initially, the canal was re-opened, a road bridge removed between Ducie Street and Brewer Street, locks were replaced and a marina created.

In 2006 TCS developed a 33,100 sq ft office building for an owner occupier (BDP architectural practice) as their northern headquarter. This building achieved a BREEAM 2006 rating of Excellent for environmental sustainability.

Within the Piccadilly Basin estate on Great Ancoats Street TCS built a landmark 140,000 sq ft retail warehouse with full A1 consent this was let to ILVA as a single occupier – unfortunately ILVA went into administration in 2008 leaving TCS with the challenge of how to deal with a bespoke building. They overcome this challenge successfully by separating the building into a number of units creating the Urban Exchange retail park. Occupiers include Aldi, Go outdoors, M&S Outlet and Pure Gym.

In 2008 TCS completed the development of Carvers Warehouse, a Grade II* listed and the oldest warehouse in Manchester. The completed building offers a combination of contemporary and character office accommodation.

The Tariff Street site has been identified for a residential building since planning permission was granted for the Piccadilly Basin masterplan in 1998. Much of that masterplan has been delivered including the refurbishment of Jackson’s Warehouse and the construction of Vantage Quay to the west of the marina.

The proposed development will complete the original design intent for the marina which envisaged an enclosing residential building running parallel to it. Planning Permission was also granted in 2007 for a residential scheme at the site.

In recent years, TCS has sought to ensure that the vacant development plot does not detract from the wider area by temporarily grassing over what was previously an unusable brownfield site. Improving market conditions and the clear need for new residential development in the City means that the time is right to bring forward permanent regeneration proposals for the site.

Piccadilly Basin - west side

Piccadilly Basin - west side

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35 comments so far, continue the conversation, write a comment.

AnonymousAugust 20th 2014.

why take away another of the last remaining green spaces in the city centre and not a dirt patch car park?

SteveAugust 20th 2014.

Why oh why oh why does it always have to be an Ian Simpson design? The city centre is becoming totally monopolised by his boring designs! Someone in that Town Hall's planning department must be getting a nice back hander.

2 Responses: Reply To This...
crisbyAugust 21st 2014.

Why oh why do some people assume that whenever something happens that they don't like, it's because someone is getting a backhander? If you've evidence of that, report it. Otherwise maybe you should consider shutting up except when you know what you're talking about?

AnonymousNovember 24th 2014.

God how I agree. This man can design stunning structures in London. Look at his design for Blackfriars,but everything in our city lacks ambition and looks cheap.

AnonymousAugust 20th 2014.

I've known planners reject designs by one architect and told the authority presenting the design to go to Ian Simpson. Whereby they produced something incredibly similar for twice the cost, which was then accepted by the planner.

3 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousAugust 20th 2014.

Haha of course you did anon.

AnonymousAugust 20th 2014.

if you're going to start some idiotic conspiracy theory at least do some basic research, namely how the planning process actually works.

AnonymousAugust 29th 2014.

The Wharf in Castlefield. 2 failed applications by 1 architect so went to Ian Simpson. That failed and went to appeal. A revamped Simpson design went in based on the recommendations of the appeal and that was rejected. Peel Holdings went off in a huff and the Wharf opened.

Agent BlackAugust 20th 2014.

Manchester city centre, one big apartment block...

Mark TaylorAugust 20th 2014.

For gods sake will ian Simpson architects (should be renamed "one trick pony" architects) please vacate our city and bud their one trick ponies elsewhere

AnonymousAugust 20th 2014.

Ian Simpson? Not exactly architects, more design by way of a Sim City app.

PaulambleAugust 20th 2014.

please show the elevation from Brumswick mill - its dismall -

AnonymousAugust 20th 2014.

There was no consultation at all - they held one event in an evening - only informed people a few days before, and then did not take into account one single issue raised or discussed - the application submitted is identical to the pre-consultation application. This goes against the purpose of consultation and is against planning policy at a local and national level. We also know that there are rights of light issues to specific apartments in Jacksons Warehouse that they are trying to brush under the carpet - the application confirms this, as does the significant negative impact on Jacksons Warehouse, a historic grade two star listed building.

4 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousAugust 20th 2014.

Library Walk anyone?

AnonymousAugust 20th 2014.

Is relevant how?

AnonymousAugust 20th 2014.

Library walk is very relevant. It was designed by Mr Simpson, and the consultation was also a sham.It too does damage to an adjacent listed building (or two) Goes against the purpose of consultation, planning policy, etc. etc. Enough for you?

AnonymousNovember 24th 2014.

Library walk is another Piccadilly gardens in the making. We will be debating the disaster for the next twenty years. A hideous mistake which totally ruins that stunning curved ginnel. Very sad

AnonymousAugust 20th 2014.

Save Manchester @SMasH and residents have actually been unable to speak to developers, as they have refused to meet with us, a request was made to them direct, and to their planning consultants and they have blank refused. Shame on them

GimboidAugust 20th 2014.

Any further details about this Smash group? Can't find anything online.

2 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousAugust 20th 2014.

@savemanchester on twitter or contact jacksons warehouse via urban bubble

GimboidAugust 20th 2014.

Thanks Anon

Hero
Jill BurdettAugust 20th 2014.

Apologies. Link to full planning app here: pa.manchester.gov.uk/…/simpleSearchResults.do;jsessionid=41176A943E9778FBB616FC4EB0019E14…

AnonymousAugust 21st 2014.

Great looking building, get it built.

1 Response: Reply To This...
AnonymousAugust 22nd 2014.

Ok

AnonymousAugust 24th 2014.

Manchester city centre is great - I love how they hate nature here...grass...flowers...those tree things. I love the soulnessless of it all. This city is so far ahead of central London with its Hyde Park, Green Park and Regents Park. So behind the times. I also love Manchester because of these new buildings which generally have no character. Just plates of glass stuck together. Love the blandness. Beats those grand stone and brick buildings. Can't wait for those to be demolished. And they Manchester hasn't got character?!! Pah!! In 100 years time they'll be talking about the Hilton building.. not bloomin St Paul's Cathedral!!

AnonymousAugust 29th 2014.

One of the few bits of green space in the city centre being replaced by an ugly apartment block. Delightful.

AeronSeptember 2nd 2014.

I think the building looks great and, while I am fully in favour of more green space in the city centre, this is a tiny patch of turf used by sunbathers on the few occasions the sun has shone this summer. The ambitious development of Piccadilly Basin, where I happen to live, stalled in 2008. This should be heralded as the re-start (hopefully) of those plans. We might then, at least, see the back of one of the city's longest standing pop-up car parks, the hideous Dale Street car park, which blights the whole basin. And if plans aren't forthcoming for DSCP soon, why not press for this (much larger) piece of land to be greened, perhaps with a regular outdoor market? The former Basin plans, if I recall, included a mini multi-storey car park on this land anyway. Why not press ahead with this if parking is at such a premium and free up the rest of the land for alternative uses until the developers finally return?

2 Responses: Reply To This...
AeronSeptember 2nd 2014.

Alternatively, use the rest of Dale Street Car Park for allotments - Northern Quarter Greening have already struck a small-scale deal with the landowner. Why not make it a more commercial proposition? I'm sure many city-centre dwellers would relish having their own patch of land to grow fruit and veg. Whatever the answer, it surely has to be better than YAFCP (to pinch one of MC's acronyms about Italian restaurants!)

AeronSeptember 2nd 2014.

NAFCP*

Hero
Jill BurdettSeptember 10th 2014.

Planning Committee Sept 11th. Scheme recommended for approval www.manchester.gov.uk/…/planning_and_highways_committee…

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