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Manchester: doing well, but could do better

New report sees tourism and economy on the rise, but skills are still an issue

Published on August 2nd 2010.


Manchester: doing well, but could do better

More than seven million visitors pumped £1.2 billion into the Manchester’s tourism economy in 2008/09, according to a new State of the City report.

“The picture is encouraging and shows the concerted progress which the city council, police, health services and other partner agencies are making on many fronts. But it is not an airbrushed picture. It also shows that in some areas issues are deep-seated and this progress has not been as rapid or as consistent as we would wish.”

The report, drawn up by the Manchester Partnership, also said that Gross Value Added (GVA), a measurement used to assess the value of goods and services produced in an area, nearly doubled for Greater Manchester South (which covers Manchester, Trafford, Stockport, Tameside and Salford) from £11,705 per person in 1995 to £22,172 per person in 2007.

It said that not enough Manchester residents had the skills to enable them to reach their full potential in employment, however - more than a fifth have no qualifications - and despite an improving trend the city still has persistently high levels of worklessness.

On transport, the report revealed that two-thirds of journeys into the city centre are not made by car - 69.4 per cent of trips in 2010 were made by bus, tram, train, bike or on foot compared with 62.7 per cent in 2005.

Crime figures continued to fall. Serious acquisitive crime (which includes burglary and car theft) fell by almost a fifth in 2009/10 with more than 4,000 fewer victims of crime across the city.

In a series of telephone surveys with Manchester residents, five per cent described themselves as dissatisfied with their lives and 89 per cent said people from different backgrounds got on well in their local area.

Male life expectancy in Manchester up from 70.8 years in 1999-2001 to 73.8 years in 2006-2008 – but it still the second worst in England.

Manchester City Council leader Sir Richard Leese said: “We have a clear vision of where we need to get to as a world-class city and the information in this report gives us a clear understanding of how far we are along that road.

“The picture it reveals is encouraging and shows the concerted progress which the city council, police, health services and other partner agencies are making on many fronts.

“But it is not an airbrushed picture. It also shows that in some areas issues are deep-seated and this progress has not been as rapid or as consistent as we would wish. The report gives us a solid evidence base to equip us to confront these challenges while building on the city’s achievements.”

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