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Mangled Car Makes A Point

Samantha Atherton and the shock tactic of displaying a car wrecked when drink-driver died

Written by . Published on March 21st 2013.


Mangled Car Makes A Point
 

A MANGLED, rusting wreckage of a bomb-ravaged car was brought by Jeremy Deller to Manchester’s Imperial War Museum North in 2010, illustrating the reality of life in a 'liberated' Iraq still riven by sectarian violence.

By using shock tactics like this, we are pushing people to think of the consequences that having one drink and driving a car can cause. 

Manchester has now welcomed another mangled car display to our city. This time though the message is closer to home, encouraging people to think about the consequences of drink driving.

Delivered as a part of Manchester Universities Well-being Week, the presentation also featured a £50,000 pint displayed behind velvet ropes and housed in a protective glass case representing the personal financial cost of drink-driving, as calculated by the Institute of Advanced Motorists.

The calculation reflects the fines, legal costs, rise in insurance premiums and possible job losses faced by those who are convicted.

Posh pint of woePosh pint of woe

Road Safety Minister Stephen Hammond said: “Most people know not to drink and drive but a small number still do, which is why we are highlighting the consequences of a drink drive conviction through our THINK! campaign."

The new car wreckage known as the Think! Car was owned by a 21-year-old man who lost control of his car on his way home, hit a tree and died.

Inspector Matt Bailey-Smith from Greater Manchester Police said: "Drink driving ruins lives. It can cost motorists their family, job and worse still, their life or that of somebody else.

 "Many people do not think of the consequences of driving under the influence of alcohol until it is too late and police are committed to tackling this issue so that we can make the roads of Greater Manchester a safer place to be."

Confidential wondered whether such shock tactics were useful.

Most drink-drivers, or for that matter speeders, have been bombarded by advertisements, campaigns and warnings since they were old enough to sit up and watch television, and yet they still do it. So what is the point of these campaigns?

Inspector Matt Bailey-Smith told us: “By using shock tactics like this, we are pushing people to think of the consequences of having one drink and driving a car. Shock tactics are important so that people put themselves into that situation, and that they can see the terrible results."

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AnonymousMarch 21st 2013.

erm think you mean jeremy deller mancon? x

1 Response: Reply To This...
EditorialMarch 21st 2013.

Thanks.

AnonymousMarch 21st 2013.

better... but not quite right.... its deller not dellar

1 Response: Reply To This...
EditorialMarch 21st 2013.

Are we sorted now?

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