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CGI Heaven From NOMA

Here's a lovely walk-through video from Noma at MIPIM

Published on March 10th 2015.


CGI Heaven From NOMA
 

THE MIPIM MEDIAWALL FROM MANCHESTER CONFIDENTIAL - a digital town crier across all social media platforms. 

WE love a good walk-through of the city, a good re-imagining.

Here's a realisation of what the new city centre square in NOMA will look like. It looks just dandy. 

We're already published story on Confidential about the square which created healthy debate here.

Here's the press release for the video:

'The animated film, shown today at the MIPIM event in Cannes, highlights the new City square between the iconic CIS Tower, New Century House and the Hanover building at the heart of Manchester’s NOMA neighbourhood. 

'The new development will provide a safe and welcoming space that promises a mix of cafés, restaurants, bars and shops nestled amongst the characterful buildings of the NOMA listed estate.  It is due to be completed by September 2015. 

'The footage shown at the event aims to promote Manchester’s property sector to a global audience. 

'The new, as yet un-named City Square, supported by the European Regional Development Fund and Manchester City Council, has been designed by Manchester-based architects Planit-IE, and contractors Casey are on-site undertaking initial construction works.'

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26 comments so far, continue the conversation, write a comment.

AnonymousMarch 10th 2015.

It looks great. What used to be there?

1 Response: Reply To This...
AnonymousMarch 10th 2015.

a 1960's two story office extension and the co-ops old exec parking garage.

AnonymousMarch 10th 2015.

Cafes, restaurants, bars and shops. When do we reach saturation point on these? And short of having central government ship 2000 of its broadcasting employees up here on good wages how do we get people to use them all so they are profitable?

21 Responses: Reply To This...
rinkydinkMarch 10th 2015.

Hush

AnonymousMarch 11th 2015.

The city centre population keeps rising, won't that bring custom?

rinkydinkMarch 11th 2015.

Yes Anon #2. I don't think #1 has heard of such a thing as growth

AnonymousMarch 11th 2015.

The idea that Manchester has somehow reached "saturation" point on "cafes, restaurants, bars and shops" is ludicrous. What do you want to do - hang up a sign saying "full". Manchester isn't a village or a backwater provincial town - its a major UK/European city, and its growing, impressively.

DavidMarch 11th 2015.

It's cetainly becoming a provincial backwater when it comes to shopping.Brooks Brothers,Gant,Adolfo Dominguez,Calvin Klein and now Dalvey on King Street and many more,have all closed and left.Sure we have Internet shopping and had recession,but other cities like London have thriving retail scenes like Carnaby Street and Regent Street.If Manchester only has restaurants to offer then tourists,especially high end ones are not going to come here and managing directors of companies are not going to want to be based here.

rinkydinkMarch 11th 2015.

Manchester isn't London, believe it or not. Manchester is actually Manchester. It's not got sheer number of people (yet) to support something as big as the Trafford Centre so close to town, so town suffers to an extent. I'm sure if the Trafford Centre didn't exist it'd be a different story

DavidMarch 11th 2015.

There are over 600 thousand and nearly three million in Greater Manchester.Also please don't fall for the excuse of the Trafford Centre Thats been around for nearly two decades and its retail offer is more like the Arndale,it's not and never has been a higher end retail and none of the shops that are closing are in the Trafford Centre.Its obvious that mid to high end brands no longer want to be in Manchester unlike in places like Lyon or even Leeds.Thats despite a rising population and rising wealth in the city.This suggests a monumental failure of the council to provide the right environment and the right incentives and the right developments.

AnonymousMarch 11th 2015.

Manchester "becoming a provincial backwater when it comes to shopping". Apart from London (which having a population of circa 10 million isn't comparable) which other UK cities make it a backwater? The notion that "managing directors" wont want to come here because of a lack of shopping opportunities is demented.

rinkydinkMarch 11th 2015.

David delude yourself in whichever way you want to somehow drag Manchester down. The fact is that the Trafford Centre will have had an effect on central Manchester's shopping growth to some degree since it opened. This seems logical to anyone with a brain cell. Honestly why do you come on here? You show no support for Manchester as a city in any way whatsoever

DavidMarch 11th 2015.

Being loyal to Manchester is not about keeping your mouth shut or acting as a cheerleader for the city.Manchester is failing big time as a high end retail destination.All the shops that have opened and closed,opened in the first place well after the Trafford Centre did in the late 2990s.Clearly you don't let the facts get in the way of your argument Rinkydink.But this period of constant closures of shops has coincided with the councils punitative parking measures.Spinningfrields also helped destroy King Street as s retail destination but Spinningfrields has turned out to be a total disaster for retail and for that they and the council should be blamed.Turning now all those empty shops into restaurants is not success but an acknowledgment of a monumental failure.Its alright Leese and Bernstein taking credit for the successes of the city they should also take responsibility for the failures.

AnonymousMarch 11th 2015.

The fact that David thinks Leeds attracts more high end brands than Manchester proves that he doesn't know what he's talking about.

DavidMarch 11th 2015.

That says more about your prejudice against Leeds than the reality If you actually go to Leeds you will see both more independent local designers with thriving shops like Nicholas Deakins and MKI.You will see the success of the Corn exchange as retail destination unlike the sad failure of Manchester Corn Exchange,reduced yet again to another restaurant only development.The the high end shops are not closing either unlike in Manchester.

AnonymousMarch 11th 2015.

I know Leeds inside out, the two shops you mention are not high end. It is true that Leeds rents are a lot lower than in Manchester but even then Leeds has far more units on the market. There are many brands in Manchester that aren't available in Leeds.

AnonymousMarch 11th 2015.

David, I'd describe myself as a reluctant shopper but aren't you rather out of focus on this? Manchester has a Selfridges, a Harvey Nichols, several major departmental stores, one the biggest M&S stores in the UK, a number of high-end retailers (e.g. Armani) the Arndale Centre which appears to contain almost every high street brand going, specialist shops, the NQ with its quirky outlets etc, etc. I really do hesitate to ask this, but what is it you are looking for that you can't buy in Manchester but could in (say) Leeds? And I see the switch from retail to food and drink in Spinningfields as a really smart and highly successful move, certainly not a failure as you appear to do. And one last point I was in Lyon la couple of years ago and the central shopping mall is poor (though it does of course have some great restaurants) There's good and not so good in every city, but describing Manchester as a "big time" failure in terms of retail is way off-beam.

DavidMarch 11th 2015.

I did not say those two shops were high end.But considering its smaller catchment area Leeds is doing better.There are too many greedy landlords in Manchester who are not thinking long term.Just filling all the units in the city with restaurants because they will pay the high rents,will lead to a seriously unbalanced city centre.A successful city has a diversified offering and one that will particularly attract the high spenders and without them you can forget about having five star hotels in the city.

AnonymousMarch 11th 2015.

David's back with a vengeance.

rinkydinkMarch 11th 2015.

He can't even see beyond his own massive nose that things are in a heightened state of flux currently. The changes that are happening now could well mean that in 5 years the shopping situation might improve - because of the current growth. But let's not have hope, let's just thrash around like a baby. Crying and lashing out

AnonymousMarch 11th 2015.

What I don't understand is why David thinks its the councils fault. If mancunians had more money more shops would open here the council cant be faulted for that. Brands that moved to spinningfields can only blame themselves if they ended up in a retail desert. Its not the councils fault.

Mark FullerMarch 11th 2015.

Davids a sharp suited fashionista, a debonair man about town, furious that any number of "suits you sir"up market retailers have deserted King Street- and it's all the councils fault, in particular the debauched duo, Bernstein and Leese. I admit to enjoying Davids rants, they add to the gaiety of the Mancunian nation, but the pessimism is misplaced. Manchester already has a good retail offer, it's retail spend is higher than that of Leeds and Birmingham, and it's going to get even bigger and also much more diverse. As the great Manchester renaissance gathers pace we'll see more big spenders in town, from China, Europe and locally from Cheshire all looking for quality products and services. Of course. there will be future recessions and rough patches leading to some set-backs and failures. But the trajectory is up for Manchester, and only a natural disaster of gargantuan proportions can stop it now.

GimboidMarch 11th 2015.

Only David could seriously suggest with a straight face that there is any danger whatsoever of "filling all the units in the city with restaurants". There is literally NO chance of this happening.

TomMarch 11th 2015.

"other cities like London have thriving retail scenes like Carnaby Street and Regent Street" How many other cities are there like London? Three? A dozen, maybe? Manchester is failing because it doesn't match up to the retail offer of one of THE most important cities in the world? Daft.

Manci DoodleMarch 11th 2015.

Oh dear. There seems to be another noisy, distracting media screen. Mcr already has several of these wretched things. That is not very dead good...

1 Response: Reply To This...
AnonymousMarch 11th 2015.

You must hate New York, or any major Far Eastern City.

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