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55,000 New Homes By 2027 For Manchester

Ambitious partnership, Manchester Place, aims high

Published on July 30th 2014.


55,000 New Homes By 2027 For Manchester
 

AN alliance between Manchester City Council and the Homes and Communities Agency (HCA) was announced this week to provide a major stimulus to residential development in the city. 

Forecasts suggest that the city has the potential to generate an extra 50,000 jobs by 2023 and that by 2030 the population will exceed 600,000.

The partnership will see a creation of development-ready sites to help the city meet its ambitious target of creating 55,000 new homes by 2027 as set out in the Manchester Residential Growth Prospectus. 

Manchester Place will work with investors, developers and others who wish to support high quality housing across the city to ensure there are sufficient opportunities. Where justified, this could include providing access to public resources. 

Forecasts suggest that the city has the potential to generate an extra 50,000 jobs by 2023 and that by 2030 the population will exceed 600,000. 

“This is a significant partnership which should have a huge positive impact on Manchester’s housing market.” Deborah McLaughlin, North West Executive Director at the HCA has said: “Manchester’s population is growing enormously quickly, and this partnership will accelerate the supply of much-needed housing in the city.” 

Key tasks for the partnership, Manchester Place, will include working with landowners to get sites ready for development, assembling land where necessary, and using the land resources and market intelligence of both the Council and HCA to produce a coordinated response to government initiatives encouraging house-building. 

An annual investment plan will identify priority areas for public and private sector investment which can create residential growth. These will be designated as Investment Action Areas, with Ancoats and New Islington one of the first.

Phase one of the multi-phased Manchester Life initiative will see the provision for more than 830 homes in Ancoats and New Islington, building on the regeneration activity over the last 15 years to complete their redevelopment. 

The development plan has secured investment from partnership Manchester Life, a privately owned company combining Manchester City Football Club and Abu Dhabi United Group who plan to bring 6,000 new homes to east Manchester over the next 10 years.

The activities of Manchester Place will be overseen by a project board, chaired jointly by the chief executive of Manchester City Council and the regional director of the HCA.

 These new homes will strengthen Manchester’s economic growth trajectory by providing much needed residential units, helping the city achieve its Residential Growth Strategy to build tens of thousands of new homes by 2027. 

http://www.homesandcommunities.co.uk

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17 comments so far, continue the conversation, write a comment.

ShybaldbuddhistJuly 31st 2014.

What about the 13,000 long term empty houses we have in Manchester? Are they going to be put back in to use?

3 Responses: Reply To This...
Poster BoyJuly 31st 2014.

The alliance is unequivocally good news. Your source for the 13,000 is not stated. The City Council late last year acknowledged a total of approx 9,500 empty dwellings (of which 1,250 were long term empty). In contrast the Empty Homes Agency estimated approx 5,400 empty homes of which, just over 1% (2,700) of the total stock was long term empty. The issue is that many of these are in private ownership, over which the City Council has no jurisdiction.

AnonymousJuly 31st 2014.

I read about this not too long ago, possibly on here. Someone used the freedom of information act and the council passed on all the relevant information about empty houses in Manchester. And from what I can recall it was over 13,000 properties.

AnonymousAugust 2nd 2014.

Well said poster boy. People seem to assume the council can just tell owners to bring properties back into use. If it was that easy it would have been done years a go.

rinkydinkJuly 31st 2014.

This is manchesterconfidential. It isn't the fountain of all knowledge and so you won't get a question like that answered on here

2 Responses: Reply To This...
ShybaldbuddhistJuly 31st 2014.

I wasn't looking for an answer as such, I'm just letting people know that there's over 13,000 long term empty houses in Manchester (and that's just Manchester, not Greater Manchester) This situation needs addressing. And tbf people within local government will read this website, so you never we may get an answer.

AnonymousAugust 2nd 2014.

Why don't you write to MCC and ask them rather than waiting for a reply on here. The council have on an empty homes team who I'm sure will be happy to respond to you.

CarynJuly 31st 2014.

New Islington? A made up name instead of it's actual name, Beswick. They cant even use Beswick on tram stops it's either 'Holt Town' or 'Eastlands'. Agree with SBB, 13,000 empty properties in MCR is scandalous. And are these new homes gonna be housing association owned then or yet more unaffordable privately owned apartments I wonder?

3 Responses: Reply To This...
GimboidJuly 31st 2014.

Not sure what your point is about the tram stop names. Almost all of your facts are incorrect to start with. "New Islington? A made up name instead of it's actual name, Beswick" It's actually part of Ancoats, the renaming happened over 10 years ago. "They cant even use Beswick on tram stops it's either 'Holt Town' or 'Eastlands'" It wouldn't be very helpful if all the tram stops in Beswick were called Beswick, would it? Holt Town is legitimate as it's a historic name for that area (www.pittdixon.go-plus.net/…/e-mcr.htm…). The other stops are Etihad Campus and Velopark, not Eastlands. Beswick is a large area and it's not helpful to name the tram stops after the whole ward. It's the same practical reason that not all of the trams stops in the city centre are called 'city centre'. I'm not sure if you're trying to imply something political about the tram stop names, but you should probably get your facts right before trying to make some kind of point.

Richard HJAugust 1st 2014.

The name New Islington dates back to 1840 in that area. en.wikipedia.org/…/New_Islington…

AnonymousAugust 1st 2014.

What twenty to seven?

AnonymousJuly 31st 2014.

I don't know what the Councils policy is on empty homes but it strikes me that the 2 issues aren't mutually exclusive. It's possible to have a policy on empty homes and build new ones. Just sayin'.

1 Response: Reply To This...
AnonymousJuly 31st 2014.

A little like this...www.manchester.gov.uk/…/empty_properties…

AnonymousJuly 31st 2014.

Get Rowlinsons on the case they can buy up the empty properties that the council have left stood neglected for years and get them brought back into use theres one solution, the other stop demolishing derelict buildings in the city centre i mean, wheres the eco credentials here??? People think its generally more preferable to retrofit these structures than costly rebuilding, especially when bringing in decent reputable contractors who can retain the essence of the original building..and heritage( but no more Urban Splash please!!??).but no, theres too many deals to be done. Manchester likes to think its becoming a hotbed of prime "real estate" offices and apartments, but dont be fooled many are lyjng empty gathering dust, just look in estate agents windows in town you will see. I agree in addressing the current circa 13k properties that stand idle....maybe more incentives for those owners to bring them back into use offering grants? Many homes possibly dont need that much attention to bring them into safe use.....does Manchester still have an empty property officer? They could offer to buy up some private ones as I know they have done!!!

1 Response: Reply To This...
AnonymousAugust 2nd 2014.

Most empty properties are privately owned therefore the council can't do much.

JoanAugust 1st 2014.

The most recent Freedom of Information request for empty homes figures can be found here: www.whatdotheyknow.com/…/empty_homes_by_ward_level… It shows just 61 city centre properties unfurnished and unoccupied for over 6 months. The total across the whole of Manchester, by my quick calculation, stands at under 2,000. Ownership? I don' know, but probably not many in council hands.

AnonymousAugust 1st 2014.

I guess this comes down to what MCC consider to be “homes.” Too little regeneration in the city has created genuine residential neighbourhoods; letting the short-termism of the market and favoured parasitic developers dictate what gets built. A lack of quality control over many developments has done little to build sustainability into housing provision which would have a real and lasting economic value to the city. There is still after 20yrs of Leese & Bernsteins’ vision a lack of green space to attract families (or new schools), and the ineptitude by which they run neighbourhood services such as street cleaning and security undermines all the rhetoric they voice. The HCA and the Council are endorsing a 100% managed property idealogy (as witnessed with the Co-op’s NOMA project- which means these homes will not be sold on the open market to potential owner-occupiers) together with the continuation of an absentee buy-to-let model which does little to attract a broad demographic who will actually make contribution to the notion of “community” and neighbourhood. Is Manchester really solving the residential problems of its post-industrial exodus of just feeding another City of London financial property feeding frenzy?

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