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Moston Lane's 'Little Lagos': The Next Curry Mile?

L'Oréal Blackett explores Harpurhey's cluster of African establishments with a dream to extend one mile long...

Written by . Published on September 5th 2014.


Moston Lane's 'Little Lagos': The Next Curry Mile?
 

THE ‘LITTLE LAGOS’ concept came as a result of a late night passionate exchange of ideas with Farida Anderson (MBE) -  just before Turtle Bay Caribbean restaurant was launched on Oxford Street and immediately after I’d been infuriated by a below-par Jamaican offering in Rusholme.  

Anderson is director of twenty-year-old Caribbean independent, Buzzrocks (owned by her husband Basil ‘Buzz’ Anderson), and has seen continued support following its expansion from a van to three takeaways over the decades - it counts Stone Roses' Ian Brown as a fan.

"My plan is to create an Africanised version of KFC selling suya, chicken and chips. Mark my words you will hear about it.”

On this occasion we were doing the usual complaint dance when it comes to discussing both Caribbean and African’s foods slow up rise on the British culinary scene.

What’s preventing Caribbean and African takeaways becoming as statutory on a Saturday night as ‘going for a curry’?

Could jerk chicken also become an adopted Brit like the donner kebab?

Why doesn’t Caribbean food have its own section on Manchester Confidential? 

Anderson and I were also pondering solutions.

“Some restaurant owners don’t have the business acumen or the funds to make it work – which is a shame,” she explained.

“The overhead costs can reach well into the hundreds and thousands just for a small takeaway. Also, Caribbean food takes a hell of a long time to cook. Buzz wakes up every morning at dawn to buy vegetables – he’s in his sixties now but that’s something he insists on doing. Some aren’t prepared or committed to that.”

Buzzrocks And Ian BrownBasil 'Buzzrocks' Anderson(r) and Ian Brown

The Andersons have met some success. They saw route for expansion in North Manchester and opened up another Buzzrocks on Moston Lane in Harpurhey ward after noticing a surge of both African and Caribbean owned food establishments in the area.

 “There are so many African - mainly Nigerian - owned businesses and it’s great to see. I don’t see why Moston Lane couldn’t be the African-meets- Caribbean equivalent to the Curry Mile. It’s like a little Lagos down there,” she revealed.

That’s where the wheels of thought started turning.

I’ve never been to Jankara, Nigeria’s largest market, but I immediately conjured up images of stalls selling yams, plantain, fruits, fabrics, jewellery and locals bartering down prices.

While only a short bus trip via Shudehill, I’ve also never ventured to Moston Lane in North Manchester before.

For good reason.                                                 

Harpurhey was described as ‘the worst place in England’ in a government 2007 study.

Dsc_0297

Harpurhey - the worst place in England?

Moston Lane had been dubbed 'alcohol alley' by councillors for its large number of off-licences and problems with alcoholism. The BBC didn’t do Harpurhey much justice with its People Like Us documentary and was subsequently damned for exploiting images of working class poverty ('poverty porn'), benefit theft, alcoholism, teenage pregnancy and overall marring the community’s reputation.

Without the prospect of stumbling on an area swirling with colourful and flavoursome foods from vast the African continent and Caribbean islands, I would have never ventured there.

Somewhat naive of me, Moston Lane still sounded like an area that had bigger dreams of becoming a one-stop destination for all things African.

I would need a bigger picture to prove it.

Img_7664An African supermarket

Img_7677African owned boutique

 I travelled by taxi first - after all Little Lagos is only a concept at this stage, you can’t Google Map it. Stuck with a flummoxed driver, I was dropped off at a roundabout and decided to walk and ask around. I was told I couldn’t miss it.

This part of Moston Lane is so overtly African you could find yourself tripping over an elephant tusk on the way to the market.

There’s afro-hair barbershops and salons, outdoor and indoor markets, traditional fabric shops and seamstresses. On this Saturday afternoon men had gathered outside Spices African Cuisine to drink.

Img_7669African 'Superstore'

Img_7676Overtly African...and Polish

I first stopped by Kether African fish, meat and vegetable wholesalers. A woman on the hunt for a specific Nigerian vegetable followed me in but was not having much luck. Maglou, the owner, was flummoxed as he’s originally from Cameroon. 

“That’s the problem when people come in looking for Nigerian food. I don’t know what they’re talking about,” he laughed.

Fluent in French Maglou has been running his fish market for three years but has lived in Harpurhey for fourteen years.

Dsc_0291Kether Africa

It’s small consisting of a few freezers and like much of Moston Lane, is on the shabby cluttered side.

Mag’s optimistic for the future of Moston Lane and said, “I think in five to ten years we could see a big improvement in the area. I’ve already seen it. It was a far rougher area but there’s been new housing developments and house prices have risen.”

He added passionately, “We could certainly replicate something like the Indian men in Rusholme.

“I would like to see a large restaurant specialising in African food. I would love the Englishmen to come and experiment. They may not understand it but they would like it if they just tried it. We eat like the Frenchmen in Europe in Cameroon (trails off into fabulous succession of French words).”

Chin ChinAfrican snack Chin Chin

BoboloBobolo

Insisting I call him Mag, he leaves his shop to take me over to meet a ‘big boss on Moston Lane’. The big boss in question was in the middle of opening his new suya cafe that had yet to be named. There was suya (chicken and lamb on kebab skewers) cooking on the stove and calypso music booming from a large stereo.

I was met with suspicious eyes (they followed me throughout the whole afternoon) and the big boss didn’t want to be named. Regardless he had a lot to say about the Lane and his personal plans. Unlike Mag, he had little hope for an African Curry Mile.

“No I don’t see it happening,” he said abrubtly.  “Three African stores have failed to get licenses. Afro flavours. Closed. Akwaba. Closed. Dees Cuisine. Closed.

Dsc_0294Suya cooking on the grill.

“In my opinion, it’s because Moston Lane is a high crime area and the council have been strict as a result. It’s calmed in recent years, but Harpurhey will struggle even in the next decade to get more African businesses because the council just simply refuse - the council are purposely slowing progress.”

It seems crime could be the causal link to restaurant closures. Earlier this August Ma Helene restaurant was shut down after a 48-year-old man was ‘savagely beaten’ and lost his eye. After a hearing the council believed Ma Helene had also breached its licence.*

Councillor Patrick Karney of Harpurhey has since been behind rejection of two more license applications from African restaurants.

“Moston Lane has a huge drinking problem and a lot of these establisments are illegal drinking dens fashioning themselves as restaurants. The incident is a micro-example of the alcohol problem on Moston Lane - this is the deplorable behaviour we’re dealing with,” he explained. 

So are the council purposely slowing progress?

“Bona-fide restaurants offering something distinct would be welcome to the area but what we’re dealing with is late night drinking dens - some don't even come with genuine menus. Harpurhey is a residential area with a young demographic and we've received complaints that men are urinating in the street and so on.

“Moston Lane has long way to improve if it is to replicate the Curry Mile – which took decades to develop. These shops only have sectional appeal. For it to work, there would need to be some sort of integration between the host community and the African community. The shops would need to have broader commercial appeal."

Img_7673Tina, of fabric shop Divine Praise, was also refused a restaurant.

In some ways Moston Lane’s African businesses cater, understandably, for the African community, with outsiders like me peering in with wide-eyed curiosity like Muggles at Hogwarts.

Moston Lane would need to open itself up to the city centre's anthropological foodies for it to become a solid part of Manchester’s generally cosmopolitan character.

It would also need to clean up its act and start behaving.        

Even so, as I ate chicken and dumplings in Buzzocks, I spotted mixed members of the community enjoying full Caribbean meals happily. The area felt, with a lot of love and investment, as if it had promise.

After all as Cllr Karney pointed out it took a couple of decades to create the area nicknamed the Curry Mile. Certainly the African businesses offer a way forward in the time-honoured way of immigrant communities in large cities.

The model is that in a decaying area locked in a downward spiral new ideas and new entrepreneurship arrives with a new immigrant group. The area's future starts to look more promising, albeit with a very different character than that which it previously occupied had.

This seems to be happening on Moston Lane. Certainly some African business owners have big plans.

Commanding me to look him dead in the eyes, Big Boss said, “my plan is to create an Africanised version of KFC selling suya and chicken and chips.

"Mark my words you will hear about it.”

Follow @LOreal_B on Twitter

*Official response from Manchester City Council 

A Manchester City Council spokesman said: "Unlike other areas of the city, such as Fallowfield, there is no specific policy governing licence applications for Moston Lane. We view all applications for takeaways, bars and pubs in the area on their own merits, and our licensing committee assesses them in line with national legislation, looking at whether those premises are likely to lead to an increase in issues such as crime and disorder or public nuisance. We of course consult local residents and ask for feedback from Greater Manchester Police when considering all applications. 

"In addition any planning application for change of use to a food premises would be considered on its own merits, having regard to relevant guidance, and these applications are also subject to us notifying neighbours." 

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97 comments so far, continue the conversation, write a comment.

AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

'Little Lagos'? The locals call it 'Moston-bique'. It's a fun play on words for the community and the rich culture they bring with them.

GimboidSeptember 5th 2014.

This is a really great article - proper local journalism! Kudos to L'Oréal and ManCon. More, much more, like this, please.

2 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

completely agree.

Barry MaginnSeptember 5th 2014.

Yip. I used to live not far away and knew basically nothing about the area. Nice piece.

Trish KarneySeptember 5th 2014.

No thanks. I'll stick to Chorlton.

7 Responses: Reply To This...
skippySeptember 5th 2014.

The voice of the very worst kind of Chorltonite. Feel free to do one to Alderly Edge so someone who would appreciate living in a diverse and varied city can take your place.

AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

YouTube Disco Mums and you'll find a good example if Chorlton folk at outside someone's house listening to errr...some house.

Barry MaginnSeptember 5th 2014.

Truly patronising and insulting thing to say

Mark FullerSeptember 5th 2014.

A truly diverse city, can accommodate diverse opinions. Some of those who bang on about diversity and cultural enrichment are the most restrictive and fascistic when it comes to freedom of expression.

skippySeptember 5th 2014.

Zzzzzzzz sorry did you say something, Mark? Something relevant? No? Okay. As you were.

Barry MaginnSeptember 6th 2014.

Mark - I think it is closer to fascist to deride and dismiss an entire community because it does not fit exactly within the norms and expectations of an elitist class (and sorry, I know you may think Chorlton is boho chic hipster, but last time I looked hipster culture was amazingly white and middle class). I don't think that saying something isn't worth even visiting despite having never been there should be classified as 'freedom of expression'.

skippySeptember 6th 2014.

Well said Barry, that's what if I would've said if my brain worked properly.

AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

There is a really great Cameroon food stall in Bolton Market that does very well.The Ethiopian restaurant in Manchester also does really well.There is a definite long term potential for African food because of immigration,the large amount of intermarriage,and tourism to places like Gambia and Kenya,all of which are creating a larger potential market.The biggest problem is the lack of financial resources of the businesses,to spend on restaurant design to create a more inviting restaurant environment.Of course Nandos is a South African business founded by Mozambique guys,so its possible.

AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

There is a really great Cameroon food stall in Bolton Market that does very well.The Ethiopian restaurant in Manchester also does really well.There is a definite long term potential for African food because of immigration,the large amount of intermarriage,and tourism to places like Gambia and Kenya,all of which are creating a larger potential market.The biggest problem is the lack of financial resources of the businesses,to spend on restaurant design to create a more inviting restaurant environment.Of course Nandos is a South African business founded by Mozambique guys,so its possible.

13 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

The food from those parts of the African continent is dire, flavourless, unappealing to look at and just overall dull. However, North African food with it's Mediterranean vibe, spices and colour is worth writing about. Some cultures just need to leave there old sh*t behind and embrace their adopted country I'm afraid.

AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

Nonsense I seriously doubt you have ever been there.Your language and attitude comes across as extremely racist.

AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

Sorry there is no Med vibe about Moroccan food.The people there the Berbers are 100 % African and so is their food.Couscous and tagine are not Med cooking.If you knew anything about Moroccan culture,like their music,you would know it has significant influences from West Africa.

AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

Sorry there is no Med vibe about Moroccan food.The people there the Berbers are 100 % African and so is their food.Couscous and tagine are not Med cooking.If you knew anything about Moroccan culture,like their music,you would know it has significant influences from West Africa.

AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

apart from the fact it is at least a little bit on the med so you might reasonably make a med association about it.

AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

Aren't the Canary Islands closer to Morocco than Spain? You would have thought there'd be more of an African influence wouldn't you?

rinkydinkSeptember 5th 2014.

So giving your negative opinion on a country's food is racist? Get out of here...

AnonymousSeptember 6th 2014.

What he says was 100 % racist,condescending and abusive?If you think some cultures are inferior to others and so the people need to change,then you are a bigot.If you cannot see that Rinkydink then should take a good look at yourself.

rinkydinkSeptember 6th 2014.

It is not bigoted and it is not racist to criticise a country's or indeed a continent's food. You need to get a grip. Take a good look at myself? Listen love, I'm old enough and wise enough to be absolutely certain of my convictions. You on the other hand need to grow up

AnonymousSeptember 6th 2014.

If you think Africans have a inferior culture and should change it because it's 'shit'.Then you are not only ignorant of African culture and food,but a racist.Also bet you would not be telling the same things to French or Spanish that come to this country,but then they are white.

AnonymousSeptember 6th 2014.

Rinkydink your views are racist.

rinkydinkSeptember 6th 2014.

I shall repeat myself again - criticising a nation's food is not racist. Show me a link to something that says it is. His choice of words could have been better but it is not against the law (which racism is) to criticise food. It is foodist (titter) at the most. What I am also certain of is that your views are immature and idiotic

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

Ha, now criticising food is being twisted into a racist comment? The last I heard, Africa is a continent and not a race of people. There's a make-shift tent on King Street at the mo' as part of the misguided Kedem protest. Why don't you camp out there with the white (non Muslim) middle class folks and rant to your heart's content?

AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

@Anon 3 I have been to three countries in Africa and the North African food is far superior. And saying that makes me a racist?

9 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousSeptember 5th 2014.

If you say some cultures need to leave their 'old shit behind',then 100% you are a racist.

rinkydinkSeptember 6th 2014.

Bobbins

Barry MaginnSeptember 6th 2014.

Scary how some people can't recognise the derisive and racist beliefs in their own attitudes. Particularly given Britain's unsavoury history in regards to many African nations. I guess these are the people who find it easy to justify voting UKIP.

AnonymousSeptember 6th 2014.

Barry, it's scary how some people can spot racism so easily and are quick to accuse others of it.

Barry MaginnSeptember 6th 2014.

Why is that scary? Plus I don't see an accusation anywhere.

rinkydinkSeptember 6th 2014.

See the post 8 posts up from this

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

'If you say some cultures need to leave their 'old shit behind',then 100% you are a racist.'? Anon said cultures not races. Perhaps Anon's a culturist?

AnonymousSeptember 8th 2014.

Barry, I believe this Rinkydink character is American so let's not attribute his views to those of 'Britain' and any British history. To fail to see the ignorance in the original (Fri 1:10pm) 'Anon' post is probably more indicative of his cultural upbringing.

AnonymousSeptember 8th 2014.

@Above Anon 'To fail to see the ignorance in the original (Fri 1:10pm) 'Anon' post'? Nothing ignorant about being critical of this article's food and of some cultures.

rinkydinkSeptember 6th 2014.

Especially when the person being accused is the child of an African-American man and a white English woman. But let them carry on, I find it hilarious

8 Responses: Reply To This...
rinkydinkSeptember 6th 2014.

(In reply to anonymous post above this...)

AnonymousSeptember 6th 2014.

Classic and utterly irrelevant defence. You'll be going down the 'some of my best friends...' route soon

rinkydinkSeptember 6th 2014.

Its like calling Elton John homophobic. Get out of here you over-sensitive, patronising buffoon

AnonymousSeptember 6th 2014.

Being Part African American does not prevent you from having prejudice towards Africans.The two are entirely different in cultures.

rinkydinkSeptember 6th 2014.

Show me where I have said anything against Africans. As someone who has experienced racial hatred (racism) first hand, I don't appreciate what you are inferring

skippySeptember 6th 2014.

What bollocks Rinkydink, by your logic Pakistanis can't be racist against Indians.

rinkydinkSeptember 7th 2014.

Obviously you're right Skippy. What I was trying to get across was that as a mixed race man myself, and having experienced racism, I know first hand what it is like and therefore would never act in a racist way. I will defend however, the right of anyone to openly criticise the food of another nation or continent without ridiculously being labeled racist. The people that label it racist are over-reacting and actually do the cause no good whatsoever. That, Skippy, is the bit that is bollocks

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

@Skippy Pakistanis and Indians are people from those countries, they are not races of people. Going off Mancon alone, 'racist' is an overused and much abused word and taken out of context at times.

AnonymousSeptember 6th 2014.

You seem to claiming black privilege to say you could not be prejudiced against Africans.African Americans,Jamaican,Africans all have totally different cultures and are quite capable of being racist to each other.Just because your black you don't share anything with another black,except your skin colour.

2 Responses: Reply To This...
rinkydinkSeptember 6th 2014.

I agree

rinkydinkSeptember 6th 2014.

However I am not claiming anything as I haven't said anything about anyone's culture

Mark McGinnSeptember 6th 2014.

Sorry I agree with rinkydink on this. Saying a country's food is shit does not make you racist. People across the world have been saying the same about British food for years. I might disagree but I would never accuse them of being "racist" towards us.

9 Responses: Reply To This...
Barry MaginnSeptember 6th 2014.

I don't think that is necessarily the racist part (although I would say it is a massive generalisation based on little actual evidence). I think wording like this following from one of the posts is racist however, especially when referring to countries and cultures in which Britain has a contentious colonial history: 'Some cultures just need to leave there old sh*t behind and embrace their adopted country I'm afraid'. See above.

Barry MaginnSeptember 6th 2014.

Also, sic with the 'there'

Mark McGinnSeptember 7th 2014.

I don't understand what you mean. "I think wording like this following from one of the posts is racist" Wording like what? And what post?

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

Again...anon's talking about food and culture, not races of people.

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

Mark - like the text I placed in quotes. I just wanted to make completely clear that I was quoting exactly what someone else posted, 'cause personally I wouldn't want to be associated with those words. Anyway, it's getting a bit political, I certainly don't want to try to censor opinions, I just think some of these comments are very close to the bone.

Barry MaginnSeptember 7th 2014.

Sorry, above post was me, set to Anon automatically for some reason.

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

'especially when referring to countries and cultures in which Britain has a contentious colonial history'? If that was true, Barry then the British population should never be critical of any country or country ever again? What kind of country and population would we become then, Barry? "The beginning of wisdom is to call things by their proper name." - Confucius.

Barry MaginnSeptember 7th 2014.

I think it is okay to criticise a ruling regime (not the country itself) if it is causing human rights abuses, yes. I don't think it is ever right to say a nation should dump its culture 'cause some people form Manchester don't rate it.

Barry MaginnSeptember 7th 2014.

Also, I take back any reference to the word racist. That is a strong term and I wouldn't say anyone who made any of the comments I disagree with is at all racist. But potentially verging on what could be viewed as xenophobic

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

I am another resident of the area and do disagree with what Pat Karney and the like have said about the area mostly the drunks, and I have certainly never seen Eastern European prostitutes in the area. However it can be quite intimidating with big groups of men stood about on the pavement certainly getting merry and not above making a few comments at people walking past. It's the same with the restaurants, we'd love to go in but easing through groups of people stood outside is not the most welcoming atmosphere. This is the kind of thing local businesses need to sort to maximise footfall traffic.

2 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

'it can be quite intimidating with big groups of men stood about on the pavement'? That's ok because it's culturally acceptable behaviour in their country and born and bred British people [regardless of their colour] must accept that behaviour because if they don't they will be called a racist.

AnonymousSeptember 9th 2014.

I was referring to the area as a whole, not singling out any particular group for special consideration!

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

Moston is a vibrant and diverse area with a real buzz to it. Poverty, social deprivation and crime levels are high but it's positive publicity and an adventurous spirit are what will pull the area up. I contrast this article with the recent one about the skew of opinion caused by TripAdvisor. Plaudits to Confidential on venturing out of the City Centres slick and polished establishments to try something on the fringes.

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

If a French politician was asked about British residents of France and replied,'Some cultures just need to leave their old sh*t behind and embrace the adopted country I'm afraid',there would be almighty protests in UK media,pointing out his racism.But some British think they have the right to express the same sentiments to Africans.

15 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

What he said. Spot on.

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

If someone is 'critical' of 'some' cultures why does that make that person racist?

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

Suggesting that Africans have inferior or worthless Cultures is highly racist.Especislly in the light of the slavery,exploitative colonial rule that was inflicted on Africa by Europeans who also thought that some cultures were worthless.

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

The idea that Africans were heathens and primitives devoid of culture,was used to justify the European rule of Africa.Which of course was not exploiting the resources,just bringing civilisation.

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

Just read over this again 'Some cultures (not all cultures and no mention of Africa) just need to leave there old sh*t behind (not everything about a culture is great and positive) and embrace their adopted country (well...that f***ing goes without saying). At the end of the day, the people that this article refers to have chosen to move to Moston, and that to me suggests the fact they've done that, means it's better in Moston than where they're from.

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

It's very obvious who they was referring to,on article about Africans.though you claim not to know..Reading your comments suggest you were responsible for the racist comment in the first place.The BNP would be a more welcome home for your views.

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

As no race of people, nor country, nor continent was mentioned, where is the racism?

Barry MaginnSeptember 7th 2014.

"and embrace their adopted country (well...that f***ing goes without saying)" - what like Brits in Spain are so good at doing?

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

@Barry WTF's that got to do with this article?

Barry MaginnSeptember 7th 2014.

I'm just saying that people who are notoriously bad at adopting to new cultures shouldn't accuse others of being so. Especially when the article is about people trying to bring a little bit of their culture to Manchester. It's the comment I am critiquing that has nothing to do with this article.

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

When you say 'people' are you referring to the whole British population, Barry? Some of your rants seem to be on a British 'bash' crusade. Have a re-think. This country is a brilliant place to live. If it wasn't things like this wouldn't happen news.sky.com/…/calais-migrants-caught-on-video-rushing-ferry…

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

To the person who claims the fact you not mentioned a specific race,that somehow excuses you.No it does not.If you say it about this Street in the light of a article about African food,it's very clear who you meant,and you know that.It would be the same if you addressed your comments to Rusholme or Chinatown.

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

If the comment was repeated about Canal Street it would also be very clear who was meant.

AnonymousSeptember 7th 2014.

I think the last two anons are lost in a corn maze LOL

skippySeptember 7th 2014.

Seriously, at least use a temporary pseudonym if you're going to get into a lengthy conversation, it's impossible to follow it if everyone's Anon

Karina DouglasSeptember 7th 2014.

I've lived in Moston for over 20 years & have sadly watched it's decline. I recently watched a child empty his bowels outside a food store! Turned out it was the shopkeepers son! May have been an isolated case, who knows, but it shouldn't have happened! I did confront the shopkeeper, he wasn't all that bothered! Not a nice place anymore I'm afraid!

Stacey TaylorSeptember 8th 2014.

rehoboth is the best jamaican food i have tasted! definitely worth travelling to moston lane for!

MarkkennedySeptember 8th 2014.

Ha ha funniest thread ive ever read..look... I like fish and chips and I like chicken curry I like bernard manning and I like stewart lee we live in a wonderful city in a great country... were very very lucky people... xxx

1 Response: Reply To This...
GimboidSeptember 8th 2014.

Well said sir.

EditorialSeptember 10th 2014.

EDITORIAL COMMENT: This rant has been removed. Personal insults and idiotic comments will not be tolerated. A month or so ago we published a new comment policy to stop idiot ranters such as the author of this one. www.manchesterconfidential.co.uk/…/Rant-And-Comment-Policy-Manchester-Confidential…

EditorialSeptember 10th 2014.

EDITORIAL COMMENT: This rant has been removed. Personal insults will not be tolerated. A month or so ago we published a new comment policy to stop idiot ranters such as the author of this one. www.manchesterconfidential.co.uk/…/Rant-And-Comment-Policy-Manchester-Confidential…

1 Response: Reply To This...
AnonymousSeptember 10th 2014.

Anon was right about the scrotes on Market Street though.

AnonymousSeptember 10th 2014.

Lowride bike shop opposite the unicorn pub on church street sells the best carribean food in town ...along with some top bongs fantastic machetes and the best range of grafiti sprays..brilliant shop...

1 Response: Reply To This...
AnonymousSeptember 11th 2014.

Why are bongs top? What's fantastic about machetes?

AnonymousSeptember 18th 2014.

I really hope it's not the next curry mile the area is rough enough as it is. Moston lane has turned into a no go area.

2 Responses: Reply To This...
AnonymousSeptember 19th 2014.

Agreed, it must be one of the only places in the country that's no-go even during the day.

skippySeptember 19th 2014.

No-go? The author didn't seem to think so.

AnonymousOctober 6th 2014.

This comment has been deemed inappropriate by editorial staff, and has been removed.

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